3rd September 2014


Samuel Olszta, 3, (with mom Gosia Olszta and Seattle Children's Margaret Rosenfeld, MD, MPH ) stays healthy with cystic fibrosis treatments developed, in part, through clinical research at Seattle Children's. Photo Credit: Kathy Porada
The process of inclusion rethinking clinical trials

The process of inclusion: rethinking clinical trials

Bonnie Ramsey, MD and Robert Sawin, MD, Co-Leads of Seattle Children’s initiative on how every child has the opportunity to benefit directly or indirectly from research.
Sponsored by


Bonnie Ramsey, MD

Co-Lead,
Seattle Children’s Initiative


Robert Sawin, MD
Co-Lead,
Seattle Children’s Initiative


The road to improving pediatric healthcare starts with a medical question for which there is no satisfying answer. Finding answers to these unknowns frequently involves research studies that bring together families with clinical researchers who are trying to find better care and treatment options for these young patients.  

Research studies call for participation by pediatric patients and often provide opportunities for participants to benefit from the latest thinking or therapies. Participation may include providing a tissue sample, trialing a new medication or surgical procedure, or answering survey questions about day-to-day activities.

"Vaccines for diseases like polio and better treatment options for conditions like ADHD, cystic fibrosis, leukemia and diabetes are a result of children and their families volunteering for research."

Hope for the future

It can sometimes be a difficult decision for a family to enroll their child in a study, and many families decide to opt-out. However, it’s vital that patients and their families realize they have the opportunity to improve patient care by getting involved, whether they decide to participate or not.

Children today are benefiting from research of the past that involved others like them.  Vaccines for diseases like polio and better treatment options for conditions like ADHD, cystic fibrosis, leukemia and diabetes are a result of children and their families volunteering for research. By partaking in research, participants have the opportunity to help children of the future in a similar way.

As pediatric clinicians and researchers, families expect us to challenge the status quo and develop new and better therapies for children. Every child should have the opportunity to directly or indirectly benefit from research. Participating in research studies can help make this vision a reality.


Bonnie Ramsey, MD,
Robert Sawin, MD
editorial@mediaplanet.com

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